Help Keep

The Tongue Untied

Free

Get the entire Tongue Untied 10-week curriculum in an easy-to-read PDF (complete with explanations and examples) for only $15

Add to Cart

*************

Prepositions

Prepositions are small words such as "with" and "into" that themselves are difficult to define in words. Suffice it to say that prepositions create a relationship between other words in a sentence by linking phrases to the rest of the sentence.

Prepositions can be found virtually anywhere in the sentence.

A list of common prepositions:

above
across
after*
against
among
around at
according to
before*
behind
below

beneath
beside
besides
between
beyond

by
because of
by way of
down
during

except
for
from
in
inside
into
in addition to
in front of
in place of

in regard to
in spite of
instead of
like

near
of
off
on

out outside
over
on account of
out of

since
through
throughout
to

toward
under
until*
up

upon
with
without

* These prepositions can also acts as subordinating conjunctions

Prepositions are ALWAYS followed by a noun called objects of the prepostion.

[In the following examples, the object of the preposition is bold and the preposition is underlined.]

  1. From the beginning of the storm, Dorothy was sure she would make it home.
    1. BEGINNING is the object of the preposition FROM and STORM is the object of the preposition OF.
  2. For many in the class, math proved to be the most challenging subject.
    1. You can find the object of the preposition by asking the question what about the preposition. e.g. For what? MANY. In what? CLASS.
  3. Until sunrise, the SWAT team will hide in the marsh.
    1. The preposition UNTIL serves to connect its object (SUNRISE) with the main clause. The preposition IN connects its object MARSH to the verb, making the whole phrase part of the complete predicate.
  4. The fuzzy, red cat on the fence wanders among the houses.
    1. FENCE acts as the object of the preposition ON. The whole phrase acts as part of the complete subject. HOUSES is the object of the preposition AMONG. The whole phrase acts as part of the complete predicate.

When a pronoun acts as an object of the preposition, it must take the objective case.

[In the following examples, the object of the preposition is bold and the preposition is underlined.]

  1. Bill was more that a little irritated when the water balloon fell on him.
    1. HIM acts as the object of the preposition ON. It is incorrect
  2. Theo gave a dollar to Stephen and me to go to the store.
    1. Both STEPHEN and ME act as the object of the preposition TO. It would be incorrect to write TO STEPHEN AND I.
  3. It seems like a waste of time for you and me to drive to Portland for the game.
    1. Both YOU and ME act as the object of the preposition FOR.