September 2, 2014

Pronoun Practice Exercise Answers

1. Those are Tom's. a. personal pronoun      b. relative pronoun      c. indefinite pronoun     d. interrogative pronoun     e. reflexive pronoun    f. demonstrative pronoun 2. They didn't give themselves a chance to think before beginning the … [Read more...]

Case: Nominative

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Using the nominative case indicates that the pronoun is acting as the subject of a given clause or as a predicate nominative following a linking verb. Subjective Pronouns Singular I, she, he, it Plural we, they Singular and … [Read more...]

Case: Objective

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Using the objective case indicates that the pronoun is acting as an object. Objective Pronouns Singular me, her, him, it Plural us, them Singular and Plural you. whom A pronoun as a direct object My dog likes … [Read more...]

Case: Possessive

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Using the possessive case indicates that the pronoun is showing ownership. Possessive Pronouns Singular my, mine her, hers, his, its Plural our, ours their, theirs Singular and Plural your, yours whose   With … [Read more...]

Nouns: Object of the Preposition

Prepositions are small words that create a relationship between other words in a sentence by linking phrases to the rest of the sentence. The nouns that follow them are objects of the preposition. [In the following examples, the preposition is … [Read more...]

Agreement: Pronouns that ALWAYS Take a Singular Verb

First it might be helpful to remember that the singular form of all verbs — except "to be" and "to have" — is formed by adding "s" or "es." For example: dives, runs, answers, crashes, presses and tosses. When used as a subject or adjective these … [Read more...]

Agreement: Pronouns that ALWAYS Take a Plural Verb

Always Plural Subjects When a compound subject is joined by a coordinating conjunction (and), it takes a plural verb IF the subjects refer to different people or things and if the subject cannot be considered a unit. Your investments and … [Read more...]

Agreement: Singular or Plural Subject? It Depends

When the parts of a compound subject are joined by or, but, either ... or, neither ... nor, not only ... but also the verb must agree with the subject nearest to the verb. Neither the Oregon players nor the coach was overconfident. "Coach" is … [Read more...]