November 27, 2014

Case: Objective

Using the objective case indicates that the pronoun is acting as an object.

Objective Pronouns
Singular me, her, him, it
Plural us, them
Singular and Plural you. whom

A pronoun as a direct object

  • My dog likes me.

DOG is the subject of the sentence. ME is the direct object of the verb LIKES.

  • If you don’t mind, Would you please take him to class.

YOU is the subject of the independent clause. HIM is the direct object of the verb WOULD TAKE.

  • The teachers sent her to the infirmary.

TEACHERS is the subject of the sentence. HER is the direct object of the verb SENT.

  • Whom does Alejandro wish to see?

ALEJANDRO is the subject of the sentence. WHOM is the object of the infinitive TO SEE.

  • Alex is the person whom she met at the opening.

SHE is the subject of the dependent clause. WHOM is the direct object of the verb MET.

A pronoun as an indirect object

  • Danny handed her the ball.

DANNY is the subject of the sentence. BALL is the direct object of the verb HANDED. HER is the indirect object.

  • When Eric returned from camp, his father gave him a hug.

FATHER is the subject of the independent clause. HUG is the direct object of the verb GAVE. HIM is the indirect object.

  • Tom offered Mark and me a ride home.

Tom is the subject of the sentence. RIDE is the direct object of the verb OFFERED. MARK and ME are the indirect objects.

  • Marvin wondered whom he should give the message.

HE is the subject of the dependent clause. MESSAGE is the direct object of the verb SHOULD GIVE. WHOM is the indirect object.

  • Did the group announce whom they had presented the bonus?

THEY is the subject of the dependent clause. BONUS is the direct object of the verb HAD PRESENTED. WHO is the indirect object.

A pronoun as an object of a preposition

  • For him, no other choice seems reasonable.

FOR is a preposition. HIM is the object of the preposition.

  • Between you and me, this is a tough test.

BETWEEN is a preposition. YOU and ME are an objects of the preposition.

  • Experts agree that there is a time bomb inside her just waiting to go off.

INSIDE is a preposition. HER is the object of the preposition.

  • To whom do you wish to speak?

TO is a preposition. WHOM is the object of the preposition.

  • Did Cody’s father tell him whom he wanted to save this letter for?

FOR is a preposition. WHOM is the object of the preposition.

A pronoun as an object of a verbal (Gerund, Participle, Infinitive)

  • Reprimanding Jerry and her does little good.

REPRIMANDING is a gerund. HER is an object of the gerund.

  • He wants to call her.

TO CALL is an infinitive. HER is the object of the infinitive.

  • Calling him from the shore, Tina tried to get Allan’s attention.

CALLING is a participle. HIM is the object of the participle.

Objective pronouns in a comparison

Use the objective case after “than” if the pronoun doesn’t compare or contrast with the subject, but is being compared or contrasted to an object or complement.

  • He likes us better than them. (objective case)

This means that he likes us better than he likes them.

  • He likes us better than they. (subjective case)

This means that he likes us better than they likes us.

Use the objective case after “than” if the comparison features a noun or pronoun with the adjective.

  • There is no faster runner than her.

If the sentence included only the adjective FASTER, the pronoun would be subjective (There is no faster than she).

  • You are a much better artist than him.

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Comments

  1. you are much better artist than him

    shoud it be you are much better that he (is)?
    any help pls?

  2. You are correct on both counts.
    1) “You are a much better artist than him.” We use the objective case when the comparison includes a noun (artist)
    2) “You are much better than he.” We use the nominative case when the comparison is of a quality alone (better)

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